Labs

We have resources and people that allow us to generate some of the most compelling research in the country.

Labs

  • Biomedical Image Computing and Imaging Informatics Lab (BICI2)
    We are witnessing the next-generation of biomedical images and information emerging in astounding volume and rich formats. This rapidly grown, efficiently delivered, densely connected and incrementally well-defined multimedia information has fundamentally reshaped the ways researchers  can express their thoughts, interact with their colleagues and patients, analyze their data, and lead to ultimately deeper understandings of the nature of biology and disease. The Biomedical Image Computing and Imaging Informatics Lab (BICI2) explores advanced biomedical image analysis, imaging informatics, computer vision, and machine learning technologies to answer important biological and medical questions.  
  • Biomedical Optics Laboratory 
    The mission of Biomedical Optics Laboratory is to discover and explore alternative biomedical imaging methods using visible/near-infrared light, microwave, x-ray, and ultrasound. We develop advanced computational methods for inverse problems, construct complex or simple imaging hardware, and perform laboratory, pre-clinical and clinical experiments. Our recent research interests include the development and optimization of diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, photoacoustic tomography, microwave tomography and electromagnetic wave-induced thermoacoustic tomography for a variety of pre-clinical and clinical applications including breast cancer detection, cancer margin identification, monitoring of cancer therapy, epilepsy localization, osteoarthritis diagnosis, and noninvasive study of neuro-vascular and neuro-cellular coupling.
  • Biomimetic Materials & Neural Engineering
    Our research is focused on engineering novel materials and therapeutic systems to stimulate damaged peripheral and spinal neurons to regenerate. We take a unique approach to this problem – we use electrically conducting polymers and natural-based materials (e.g., hyaluronic acid-based biomaterials, decellularized tissues) to create therapies that can electrically, chemically, biologically and mechanically trigger neurons, at both the macroscopic and nanometer-scales.
  • Cerebral Laboratory
    Our research aims to identify neural correlates of behavior and information processing in electrocorticographic signals (ECoG) in humans, which are collected via subdural electrodes placed on the surface of the cortex. ECoG enables the investigation of cortical networks with high spatial and temporal precision and in high level cognitive functions such as language and memory.  Our work has strong clinical ties and our collaborators are within the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology at the Shands Hospital and the Brain Rehabilitation Research Center at the VA Hospital. This setting facilitates rare access to the human cortex and opens unparalleled avenues for human brain research.
  • Laboratory for Mesoscale Magnetic Biomaterials (LMMB)
    The LMMB seeks to engineer future generations of magnetic biomaterials with characteristic dimensions that span the nano to micro scale (the mesoscale) and to develop new biomedical applications using mesoscale magnetic systems. These field-responsive biomaterials are attractive in a variety of biomedNeural Engineering Laboratory ical applications because in response to applied magnetic fields they can translate, rotate, deform, and deposit magnetic field energy locally in the form of stresses and heat. Such properties form the basis for the use of MMBs as magnetically controllable drug and gene delivery vectors, biosensors, MagnetoBioMechanical actuators of cell receptors and cell assembly, and agents for magnetically mediated energy delivery to destroy cells. The LMMB at the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering applies an interdisciplinary approach to the synthesis, characterization, modeling, and application of MMBs in many of these applications.
  • Molecular Imaging Laboratory
    The focus of our lab is on the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for PET and SPECT imaging.   The goal is to enhance the ability of these molecular imaging methods to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels.
  • Neural Engineering Laboratory
    The most successful biological information processing system is the brain; our understanding of it continues to inspire solutions to problems ranging from pattern recognition to motion control.additional computational insights and strategies can be gained as a result of the process of understanding signal processing and coding in small networks of neurons that have been deliberately designed for computational function.
  • Neuroinformatics Laboratory
    The Neuroinformatics Lab at the University of Florida explores neural mechanisms of cognition and motor behavior using both experimental and modeling approaches. Our recent works deal with (1) neuronal oscillations and attentional control, (2) information processing in the brain, (3) development of advanced signal processing methods for the analysis of nonstationary, multivariate neurobiological data, (4) single trial analysis of event related signals, and (5Labs) behavior and brain analysis of sensorimotor integration.
  • Stem Cell Research Laboratory 
    The Laboratory of Stem Cell Research investigates the potential of endogenous or transplantable stem/progenitor cells for repairing the diseased or injured brain. To achieve this end, we use several approaches. We investigate the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis both to understand how to stimulate endogenous brain repair and to understand how transplantable stem cells will behave in situ. We also use in vitro systems to investigate the mechanisms that govern progenitor cell behavior. We collaborate closely with the Neural Robotics and Neural Computation Laboratory to understand how transplanted neural stem cells influence a circuit and conversely, how a biologically active circuit influences transplanted neural stem cells.