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Currently, many critical care indices are repetitively assessed and recorded by overburdened nurses, e.g. physical function or facial pain expressions of nonverbal patients. In addition, many essential information on patients and their environment are not captured at all, or are captured in a non-granular manner, e.g. sleep disturbance factors such as bright light, loud background noise, or excessive visitations. In this pilot study, we examined the feasibility of using pervasive sensing technology and artificial intelligence for autonomous and granular monitoring of critically ill patients and their environment in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As an exemplar prevalent condition, we also characterized delirious and non-delirious patients and their environment. We used wearable sensors, light and sound sensors, and a high-resolution camera to collected data on patients and their environment. We analyzed collected data using deep learning and statistical analysis. Our system performed face detection, face recognition, facial action unit detection, head pose detection, facial expression recognition, posture recognition, actigraphy analysis, sound pressure and light level detection, and visitation frequency detection. We were able to detect patient’s face (Mean average precision (mAP)=0.94), recognize patient’s face (mAP=0.80), and their postures (F1=0.94). We also found that all facial expressions, 11 activity features, visitation frequency during the day, visitation frequency during the night, light levels, and sound pressure levels during the night were significantly different between delirious and non-delirious patients (p-value<0.05). In summary, we showed that granular and autonomous monitoring of critically ill patients and their environment is feasible and can be used for characterizing critical care conditions and related environment factors.

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May 3rd, 2019

HWCOE Excellence Award

Original Article: Link Parisa Rashidi, Ph.D., areceived the HWCOE Excellence Award for Assistant Professors. This award is given to faculty […]

May 3rd, 2019

Provost Excellence Award

Main Article: Link Parisa Rashidi, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, has […]

February 25th, 2019

News Coverage in CBS

A first of its kind technology developed here in Gainesville can predict the probability and possible cause of death in […]

February 25th, 2019

News Coverage in Fox13

Artificial intelligence used in the ICU to predict mortality, news story: Watch the video here: link

February 22nd, 2019

News Coverage in Alligator Newspaper

Excerpt from the original story:   UF researchers can now assess and treat a patient’s condition faster than ever before […]

February 19th, 2019

News Coverage in UFHealth News

n a hospital’s intensive care unit, doctors get a cascade of data about each patient’s condition that can be challenging […]

February 18th, 2019

NIH Trailbalzer Award

The under-assessment of pain response is one of the primary barriers to the adequate treatment of pain in critically ill […]

August 29th, 2018

Survey on EHR Deep learning available on IEEE JBHI

Our survey paper on deep learning for EHR will appear in the September Issue of IEEE JBHI: Link  

May 10th, 2018

NVIDIA’s news story on Intelligent ICU

NVIDIA reports on our intelligent ICU research, “AI Assists Doctors Monitor ICU Patients”: Researchers at the University of Florida developed […]

April 30th, 2018

Intelligent ICU paper available on arXiv

Currently, many critical care indices are repetitively assessed and recorded by overburdened nurses, e.g. physical function or facial pain expressions […]